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MEET OUR RESEARCHERS

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Pelvic Floor Disorders

The pelvic floor is composed of muscles and connective tissues that act as a foundation to support the pelvic organs, including the vagina, anus and rectum, uterus and bladder. It is shaped like a hammock, and when it becomes weak or damaged, it cannot support the pelvic organs, resulting in pelvic floor disorders that can manifest as urinary or fecal incontinence or obstruction, pelvic organ prolapse, sexual dysfunction and other problems. Instead of looking at each organ separately, we've developed a multidisciplinary approach that allows us to treat the pelvic floor as one unit. Relying on advanced pelvic imaging like three-dimensional anal ultrasound and three-dimensional high-resolution anal manometry units, we study both anatomy and function in patients with bowel control problems. The results of these tests allow us to plan minimally invasive treatments, including the newest sacral nerve stimulation techniques. By collaborating with urologists, gynecologists and other specialists, we can achieve a common goal: correcting the entire pelvic floor disorder, easing as many coexisting symptoms as possible and improving quality of life—with just one trip to the operating room.

Pelvic Floor Disorders

The pelvic floor is composed of muscles and connective tissues that act as a foundation to support the pelvic organs, including the vagina, anus and rectum, uterus and bladder. It is shaped like a hammock, and when it becomes weak or damaged, it cannot support the pelvic organs, resulting in pelvic floor disorders that can manifest as urinary or fecal incontinence or obstruction, pelvic organ prolapse, sexual dysfunction and other problems. Instead of looking at each organ separately, we've developed a multidisciplinary approach that allows us to treat the pelvic floor as one unit. Relying on advanced pelvic imaging like three-dimensional anal ultrasound and three-dimensional high-resolution anal manometry units, we study both anatomy and function in patients with bowel control problems. The results of these tests allow us to plan minimally invasive treatments, including the newest sacral nerve stimulation techniques. By collaborating with urologists, gynecologists and other specialists, we can achieve a common goal: correcting the entire pelvic floor disorder, easing as many coexisting symptoms as possible and improving quality of life—with just one trip to the operating room.

Post-Surgical Pain Management

In 2017, with 47,000 American deaths attributed to opioid misuse (up from 18,000 just 10 years earlier), the national opioid crisis was declared a public health emergency. While opioids are an important part of post-surgical pain management, they are no longer the mainstay. Our research focuses on Enhanced Recovery Pathways (ERPS) pathways and protocols for colorectal cancer and pelvic floor surgeries. Coupled with minimally invasive procedures, our methodology is centered on strengthening the body for surgery, decreasing stress response and surgical complications, and easing the opioid burden. We start with increased physical activity to strengthen the body before surgery and supplements to boost the immune system. Then, post-procedure we reintroduce liquids and feedings shortly after surgery to accelerate gut recovery and encourage walking by that same night. We also use combinations of non-opioid pain medications know as multimodal analgesia to not only reduce pain, but to decrease the need for breakthrough opioid use. The results are shortened hospital stays, accelerated recovery and improved outcomes.

80%

Preliminary data from our Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) pathways and protocols research suggest that we have been able to reduce opiate needs in our patient population by greater than 80%.

Post-Surgical Pain Management

In 2017, with 47,000 American deaths attributed to opioid misuse (up from 18,000 just 10 years earlier), the national opioid crisis was declared a public health emergency. While opioids are an important part of post-surgical pain management, they are no longer the mainstay. Our research focuses on Enhanced Recovery Pathways (ERPS) pathways and protocols for colorectal cancer and pelvic floor surgeries. Coupled with minimally invasive procedures, our methodology is centered on strengthening the body for surgery, decreasing stress response and surgical complications, and easing the opioid burden. We start with increased physical activity to strengthen the body before surgery and supplements to boost the immune system. Then, post-procedure we reintroduce liquids and feedings shortly after surgery to accelerate gut recovery and encourage walking by that same night. We also use combinations of non-opioid pain medications know as multimodal analgesia to not only reduce pain, but to decrease the need for breakthrough opioid use. The results are shortened hospital stays, accelerated recovery and improved outcomes.

80%

Preliminary data from our Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) pathways and protocols research suggest that we have been able to reduce opiate needs in our patient population by greater than 80%.

Liver Disease Research

Our liver disease research centers on the natural history and clinical course of viral and autoimmune diseases affecting the liver. Our team tests novel therapies, including new medications that can cure Hepatitis C and treat Hepatitis B, that have revolutionized the treatment of liver disease. We're proud to have participated in multi-centered clinical research trials that have led to FDA approval of medications that have dramatically impacted the length and quality of life for patients living with chronic liver diseases. Additionally, we continue to search for liver cancer molecular markers that will enhance early detection and future treatment modalities for patients afflicted with this aggressive cancer.

Approximately 4.5 million people are diagnosed with chronic liver disease annually in the US. From 2000-2015, death rates rose 31% in the US for chronic liver disease and cirrhosis.

Liver Disease Research

Our liver disease research centers on the natural history and clinical course of viral and autoimmune diseases affecting the liver. Our team tests novel therapies, including new medications that can cure Hepatitis C and treat Hepatitis B, that have revolutionized the treatment of liver disease. We're proud to have participated in multi-centered clinical research trials that have led to FDA approval of medications that have dramatically impacted the length and quality of life for patients living with chronic liver diseases. Additionally, we continue to search for liver cancer molecular markers that will enhance early detection and future treatment modalities for patients afflicted with this aggressive cancer.

Approximately 4.5 million people are diagnosed with chronic liver disease annually in the US. From 2000-2015, death rates rose 31% in the US for chronic liver disease and cirrhosis.

Fueling Dreams

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Fueling Dreams.

Do you share our passion? Join us.

Give Now